Dick Cheney’s Vote Is Worth More Than Yours

By Scott Galindez, Reader Supported News

Well, unless you’re from Wyoming. More on that later.

t’s true, Donald, Barack would have beaten you in a fair election. He probably would have beaten you in our rigged election process, too.

Donald, all you have to do is look at your favorable/unfavorable ratings. Right up to Election Day more Americans didn’t like you than liked you. The only reason you won the electoral vote is your opponent also was liked by fewer Americans than those who had a negative opinion of her.

Now go look at President Obama’s favorable/unfavorable ratings. The president also had a majority of Americans approving the job he has done as president. Why would swing voters want change if they are happy with the job the president is doing?

Let’s dig deeper into the numbers. In each of the previous two elections Barack Obama received more votes than you did this time, Donald. Let’s face it, Barack Obama motivated his base to turn out and vote. He was an inspirational candidate whose message of hope resonated with the American people.

The 2016 general election was a race to the bottom. It was a race for who more people would vote against. You lost the popular vote, Donald, by almost 3 million votes. Imagine if African Americans turned out in the same numbers they did in 2008 and 2012: you wouldn’t have had a chance.

Historically the candidate with the highest favorable ratings throughout the campaign season wins in November. That’s why I believe Bernie Sanders would have beaten you, too.

Of course, we must learn from 2016, but assigning blame will only divide us further. Without personalizing it, let’s agree to not to make the same mistake again.

Let us never again nominate a candidate that over half the country doesn’t like. It doesn’t matter if the opinion is fair or not. Ignoring numbers like that shows we are not listening to significant sectors of the population.

Help us unrig the political system, Donald. Is it fair that a vote in Wyoming counts more than a vote in New York? Did you know that, Donald? That’s right, Dick Cheney’s vote counts more than yours. Wait a minute, Dick Cheney has more voting power than anyone else. That explains a lot.

William Petrocelli did the math. Although Wyoming had a population in the last census of only 563,767, it gets 3 votes in the Electoral College based on its two senators and one congressman. California has 55 electoral votes. The population of California in the last census was 37,254,503, and that means that the electoral votes per capita in California are a lot less. To put it another way, the three electors in Wyoming represent an average of 187,923 residents each. The 55 electors in California represent an average of 677,355 each, and that’s a disparity of 3.6 to 1. If it had been a fair fight, Donald, you would not have won.

There is no way you would have beat Barack. It shouldn’t have been close, Donald. The Democratic Party nominated a candidate who was almost as unpopular as you. She tried to convince Americans that you were unfit, but she failed to make the case for why she should be president.

Hillary Clinton tried to run out the clock. Barack Obama would have been on offense right up until the closing of the polls. You couldn’t have beaten hope and change, or change you can believe in.

The honorable thing to do would be to name Bernie Sanders Vice President and then resign. You know if the system weren’t rigged he would have been president. C’mon Donald, do the right thing.

We know that will not happen, so excuse us when we oppose you at every turn. After all, we are the majority.


Scott Galindez attended Syracuse University, where he first became politically active. The writings of El Salvador’s slain archbishop Oscar Romero and the on-campus South Africa divestment movement converted him from a Reagan supporter to an activist for Peace and Justice. Over the years he has been influenced by the likes of Philip Berrigan, William Thomas, Mitch Snyder, Don White, Lisa Fithian, and Paul Wellstone. Scott met Marc Ash while organizing counterinaugural events after George W. Bush’s first stolen election. Scott will be spending a year covering the presidential election from Iowa.

Reader Supported News is the Publication of Origin for this work. Permission to republish is freely granted with credit and a link back to Reader Supported News.

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About sgalindez

Scott Galindez attended Syracuse University, where he first became politically active. The writings of El Salvador's slain archbishop Oscar Romero and the on-campus South Africa divestment movement converted him from a Reagan supporter to an activist for Peace and Justice. Over the years he has been influenced by the likes of Philip Berrigan, William Thomas, Mitch Snyder, Don White, Lisa Fithian, and Paul Wellstone. Scott met Marc Ash while organizing counterinaugural events after George W. Bush's first stolen election. Scott Moved to Des Moines in 2015 to cover the Iowa Caucus.